Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad’s Book Recommendations

Good list of books related to Islam for beginners as well as intermediate & advanced learners.

Splendid Pearls

RECOMMENDED READING LIST OF PROFESSOR TIMOTHY J WINTER
[compiled 6 April, 2009]

Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad

Timothy Winter
Sheikh Zayed Lecturer in Islamic Studies
University of Cambridge

Timothy John Winter (born 1960), aka Shaykh Abdul Hakim Murad, is a British Muslim thinker, professor, and translator. Winter has written about the interaction between Islam and secular issues spanning a wide range of disciplines. He has held a number of lectureships and administrative posts in British academia having to do with theology, the intellectual history of Islamic civilization, and international academic cooperation…[Read More]

Beginners:

  1. Abdel, Haleem M. A., trans. The Qurʼan (New York: Oxford UP, 2005).
  2. Du Pasquier, Roger. Unveiling Islam (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1990).
  3. Emre, Yunus. The City of the Heart: Yunus Emre’s Verses of Wisdom and Love. trans. Süha Faiz (Shaftesbury, Dorset: Element, 1992).
  4. al-Haddad, Abdullah. The Book of Assistance (London: Quilliam Press, 1989).
  5. Hammad, Ahmad Zaki. Lasting Prayers of the…

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My First Time with Salman Rushdie

This is an old but good post (from April 2010) by Sana Saeed. She describes what happened when she attended a lecture by Salman Rushdie at her university. I could definitely relate to her feelings about Rushdie before the lecture, and was pleasantly surprised at how the lecture unfolded. For some reason I wasn’t surprised at what he said in the Q&A though.

The Cool Table

Amongst the most memorable names to cross my ears as a child, growing up in a South Asian Muslim household, was that of (sir) Salman Rushdie. There was always an air of frustration, anger and utter hatred that seemed to accompany it’s mere mention by those of my kin. I was unaware, as a child, precisely what all the fuss was about. What I ended up gathering from the various snippets of conversations and outbursts was that he was a writer who had written some sort of novel in which the Prophet Muhammad, alongside Islam in general, was portrayed in a most vile sense. The grouping of words of those around me – including the words of those on television who would discuss him – was enough to create an authoritative perspective on the issue that I slowly, with a naive mind, took on as my own.

Regardless of what…

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The Noble American

Mohamed Ghilan

BasmalaSlide1The following is a translation of an August 22, 2014 article written by Majed Abdul Hadi for Al Arabi Al Jadeed (The New Arab) about the barbaric murder of American journalist James Foley. Majed Abdul Hadi is a Palestinian journalist and writer living in Qatar and working for Al Jazeera. I decided to translate this instead of write a piece of my own, because I feel it is important for people in the West to see this reaction coming from Arab Muslims. Abdul Hadi’s reaction is not unique by any stretch. But I chose his article because it read like a eulogy, as well as a lament over the current state of affairs in the region, which James Foley paid with his life and precious blood as he tried to be a voice for the voiceless.

The Noble American

He neither shook, nor his voice quivered, nor did he stumble on…

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Lifting the Veil of Harris & Hirsi Ali

Mohamed Ghilan

basmala_01maxresdefaultNew atheist/ex-Muslim Ayaan Hirsi Ali has been one of the people of interest to be discussed as of late. After much outcry, she lost an honorary degree that Brandeis University had intended to award her. They cite in their statement that Hirsi Ali’s “past statements are inconsistent with Brandeis University’s core values.” That was their politically correct way of saying they did not realize the extent her Islamophobia and bigotry had gone to when they initially wanted to award her that degree.

At the time there was a bit of social media lashing out that came from some figures, particularly among the new atheist crowd. Somehow it was turned into a freedom of speech issue, which it was most definitely not. For others it was a bogus Islamophobia issue – enter Sam Harris.

In spite of the increasing awareness of something wrong taking place in how Islam and Muslims are being viewed by…

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CONSCIOUSNESS, ACCEPTING THE BEST EXPLANATION

Imran Hussein

cv101

Hamza Andreas Tzortzis recently published an essay on consciousness, in which he aptly demonstrated that materialism cannot explain the phenomenon we know as consciousness in particular the hard problem of consciousness. He concluded his paper by inferring that God as the best explanation for conscious states. Furthermore Hamza explained why God was the best explanation by providing a five point breakdown which I have shared at the bottom of this post.

However some people have completely dismissed his explanation, claiming it does not explain anything, that this is the “GOD OF THE GAPS!” fallacy and so on, which is quite absurd. His inference quite clearly provides a cogent answer with great explanatory power, no one is trying to squeeze God into a gap. It seems to me that the problem is not that God is the best explanation; rather the problem seems to be well why should we accept this explanation since we don’t…

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