Mosques, Muslim Youth, and Gender Segregation

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم، وصلوات الله وسلامه على أشرف المرسلين

In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful.

The other day, I was at a local mosque, where some young Muslim men (mainly in their 20s) were having a conversation with the imam, who himself is around 30. The conversation turned to gender segregation, and one of the young men started talking about how our mosques aren’t inclusive enough to women, and part of the problem is that we have strict gender segregation. He also mentioned that the Mosque of the Prophet Muhammad ﷺ did not have a barrier between where the men prayed and where the women prayed.

Continue reading “Mosques, Muslim Youth, and Gender Segregation”

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Thoughts after reading The Brothers Karamazov

A quick summary of the events of the novel “The Brothers Karamazov” along with my thoughts and reactions after reading the book.

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم، وصلوات الله وسلامه على أشرف المرسلين

In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful.

I recently finished reading The Brothers Karamazov, a book written in the year 1880 by Fyodor Dostoevsky. It’s one of the famous classical books, although it was a challenging read and quite long (took me nearly 2 months), so I wanted to get my thoughts & reactions down in this blog post. This post isn’t really coherent so please forgive me for that. I might also edit or add more as I continue to reflect on the book.

Continue reading “Thoughts after reading The Brothers Karamazov”

Salon publishes strawman-filled smear of Max Blumenthal

I respond to Jeffrey Taylor’s libelous article about Max Blumenthal’s Charlie Hebdo documentary.

EDIT: February 2017

It has come to my attention that Max Blumenthal has become an Assadist/Putinist shill. I can’t believe I ever wrote an article defending him.

For a quick tl;dr on his change of opinion on Syria, see this: https://medium.com/@_alhamra/max-blumenthal-before-and-after-kremlin-cash-f3f198f6f4c6#.im01j57c6

In the meantime, you can see this post as more of a response to the points that Jeffrey Tayler is making, rather than a defense specifically of Max Blumenthal.


بسم الله الرحمٰن الرحيم، وصلوات الله وسلامه على أشرف المرسلين

In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful.

I recently came across an article called “We must talk about Islam: A faith that affects everyone should be susceptible to critique by all.” I saw it after it was shared on Twitter by Graeme Wood, the Sam Harris fanboy who wrote the infamous “Why ISIS is ‘Islamic'” article in the Atlantic. The “We must talk about Islam” article was published by Jeffrey Tayler in Salon on August 2nd. I’ll go through the piece, paragraph-by-paragraph, and point out the lies, misinformation and slander that it’s full of.

Continue reading “Salon publishes strawman-filled smear of Max Blumenthal”

Is Hell Just?

Whether eternal punishment in Hell (may Allah save us from it) is just.

بسم الله الرحمٰن الرحيم، وصلوات الله وسلامه على أشرف المرسلين

In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful.

One of the more controversial ideas, in some circles, is that God will punish wrong-doers with eternal damnation in Hell. In this blog post, I will first explain why it is Allah’s right to reward and punish, and we are in no position to question His judgement. I will then talk about the Islamic theory of salvation and how to attain it. Finally, I’ll answer the question: why will good people who were non-believers in God go to Hell?

Continue reading “Is Hell Just?”

Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad’s Book Recommendations

Good list of books related to Islam for beginners as well as intermediate & advanced learners.

Splendid Pearls

RECOMMENDED READING LIST OF PROFESSOR TIMOTHY J WINTER
[compiled 6 April, 2009]

Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad

Timothy Winter
Sheikh Zayed Lecturer in Islamic Studies
University of Cambridge

Timothy John Winter (born 1960), aka Shaykh Abdul Hakim Murad, is a British Muslim thinker, professor, and translator. Winter has written about the interaction between Islam and secular issues spanning a wide range of disciplines. He has held a number of lectureships and administrative posts in British academia having to do with theology, the intellectual history of Islamic civilization, and international academic cooperation…[Read More]

Beginners:

  1. Abdel, Haleem M. A., trans. The Qurʼan (New York: Oxford UP, 2005).
  2. Du Pasquier, Roger. Unveiling Islam (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1990).
  3. Emre, Yunus. The City of the Heart: Yunus Emre’s Verses of Wisdom and Love. trans. Süha Faiz (Shaftesbury, Dorset: Element, 1992).
  4. al-Haddad, Abdullah. The Book of Assistance (London: Quilliam Press, 1989).
  5. Hammad, Ahmad Zaki. Lasting Prayers of the…

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Olaudah Equiano on the Ottomans

An excerpt from Olaudah Equiano’s autobiography where he describes his experience in Turkey in the 18th century.

بسم الله الرحمٰن الرحيم، وصلوات الله وسلامه على أشرف المرسلين

In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful.

Islamic history is a fascinating subject. And one of the most interesting things to read is an account of a foreign land written by a traveler. This book excerpt combines both of those elements.

The book is called The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano. It’s an autobiography first published in 1789 by a former slave. He traveled and experienced a lot in his life, but here I want to focus on Equanio’s visit to the Ottoman Empire.

The source for this excerpt is courtesy of Project Gutenberg. A link can be found here.

Instead of using the block-quote feature, which would become inefficient for a very long excerpt, I just added lines before and after the quote. I also added my notes using a superscript (like this0) which you can read at the bottom. And I split up some long paragraphs as well. Enjoy! Continue reading “Olaudah Equiano on the Ottomans”

The Diversity of Religion

Humans follow many diverse religions, each of which claims to be the truth. What’s the best explanation for this?

بسم الله الرحمٰن الرحيم، وصلوات الله وسلامه على أشرف المرسلين

In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful.

Human beings follow many, many religions, and each one claims to be the truth. Obviously, these claims to absolute truth are, for the most part, irreconcilable. Christianity and Hinduism can’t be true at the same time. Same for Islam and Zoroastrianism. Either there is one God, or many deities, or none. The mutual exclusivity of the world’s religions (and for the purposes of this post I’ll count atheism/agnosticism as a “religion” even though they’re technically not) should be quite clear to most people, hopefully.

So how do we explain this diversity? Continue reading “The Diversity of Religion”